29

Nov

Ft. Meade National Cemetery Stories

Elijah T. Strode

Elijah T. Strode On a spring day in March of 1851, a baby boy was born somewhere in Monroe County, Kentucky. He was christened Elijah T. Strode and would go on to have a life as a farmer and soldier until tragedy struck a month before his 30th birthday. Strode lived a humble life as a farmer in Kentucky until October 15, 1872, when he visited Elizabethtown at the age of 21 and enlisted in…

29

Nov

Ft. Meade National Cemetery Stories

Gottlieb Zimmerman

Gottlieb Zimmerman Although little is known about Gottlieb Zimmerman’s early life, as records prior to his service are unavailable, his death is well recorded in Fort Meade’s history. Although his death was a tragedy, the story surrounding his passing is one that reminds us that mental health issues have had a long presence in American history. Zimmerman had spent nearly twenty-five years in the service and had attained the status of Commissary Sergeant. On June…

29

Nov

Ft. Meade National Cemetery Stories

John E. Hammon

John E. Hammon John E. Hammon was the father of Harry and Emma Hammon. To explain the significance of this statement, John’s life story must be told. John was born in Rochester, Ohio on the 4th of December in 1857. He remained home in Ohio until 1872 when he enlisted in the 7th Cavalry. As a private in Troop G, he partook in the Battle of Little Big Horn, also known as the Battle of…

29

Nov

Ft. Meade National Cemetery Stories

Henry Charles Weiss

Henry Charles Weiss Henry Charles Weiss was born in West Germany on September 16th, 1847. When he immigrated to the United States his name was altered- several times. The old German handwriting “Weiss” resembled “Weihe” so he also became Henry Charles Weihe. But Weihe was translated to English as “White” and “Henry Charles” became a simple “Charles,” leaving Charles White to enlist in the United States Armed Forces 7th Cavalry. He could not have anticipated…

29

Nov

Ft. Meade National Cemetery Stories

James Plunkett

James Plunkett In 1878, there were four military companies that came to a new camp near Bear Butte Creek in Dakota Territory, Camp Ruhlen, to construct what was to become Fort Meade. Included in this group were Companies F and K, 1st Infantry; and Companies E and M, Seventh Cavalry. This equaled sixty-five enlisted cavalrymen and forty-seven enlisted infantrymen present in this new camp, along with their eight officers. One of these enlisted infantrymen was…